Members

Stefan Van der Stigchel - Principal Investigator

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Utrecht University
Experimental Psychology
Heidelberglaan 1
Room H.030
3584 CS Utrecht
The Netherlands

Phone: (+31) 30 253 3651 / (+31) 6 410 480 28

www.stefanvanderstigchel.nl
Email

  • Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the department of Experimental Psychology at Utrecht University
  • Member of the Young Academy of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences
  • Recipient of VENI and VIDI NWO grant, and ERC Consolidator grant
  • Author of a popular science book in Dutch about visual attention: 'Zo werkt aandacht' and concentration 'Concentration'

 

Nathan Van der Stoep - Assistant Professor

Utrecht University
Experimental Psychology
Heidelberglaan 1
3584CS Utrecht
The Netherlands
Room H0.26

Phone: (+31) 30 253 3356
Email
Twitter

By now, it is well established that our senses do not operate independently. For example, what we hear can influence what we see, and vice versa. The integration of information from different senses (multisensory integration) is important for efficient interaction with the world around us. Multisensory integration allows better localisation, identification, and faster detection of stimuli in the environment. My research focuses on the principles governing multisensory integration and the maintenance of sensory unity.

 

Teuni ten Brink - Assistant Professor

Utrecht University
Experimental Psychology
Langeveld Building
Room H0.32

Email
Website

 

 
My aim is to improve the assessment and rehabilitation of visual and attentional deficits. I use eye tracking and digitized tests with dynamic outcome measures. My approach is both fundamental and applied. Current projects focus on visuospatial neglect and visual working memory deficits in patients with acquired brain damage.
 

Surya Gayet - Assistant Professor

Voorbeeld van afbeelding

Utrecht University
Experimental Psychology
Langeveld Building
Room H0.32

Email

 

 

 

How is the continuous influx of visual information on our retinae transformed into a comprehensible visual world that is useful to behavior, and that ultimately leads to a conscious visual experience? To address this question I combine neuroimaging, computational, physiological, and behavioral methods. Keywords describing my research interests include "visual perception", "visual working memory", "consciousness", and "attentional selection".

 

Samson Chota - Postdoctoral Researcher

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Utrecht University
Experimental Psychology
Langeveld Building
Room H0.32
Email

 

 

Visual working memory processes have almost exclusively been studied under conditions where the to-be remembered stimuli were absent. In most cases however, visual stimuli stay accessibly to perception. On top of that, recent electro-physiological findings suggest that WM processes are also engaged for stimuli that are still in view. My goal is to use EEG and MVPA to investigate what information is maintained in WM when stimuli are perceptually accessible and test which factors can influence these representations.

 

Jessica Heeman - PhD Candidate

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Cognitive Psychology

Van der Boechorststraat 1
1081 BT Amsterdam
Room 18-84
Phone: (+31) 20 598 8913

Email

Website

 

 

My research projects all involve cognitive processing and eye movements. Currently I am connected to the Attention Lab as a PhD student.

 

Paul Zerr - PhD candidate

Utrecht University
Experimental Psychology
Heidelberglaan 1
Room H0.32
Email

 

 

I am interested in visual working memory in general and trans-saccadic memory in particular. I focus on spatial remapping and the relationship and time course between attention (as the distribution of cognitive resources) and memory, as well as the relationship between retinotopic and spatiotopic mapping. My toolbox includes python/Matlab/R, eye tracking, EEG and VR HMD's with eye tracking capability.

 

Alex Hoogerbrugge - PhD Candidate

Utrecht University
Experimental Psychology
Heidelberglaan 1
Room H0.15
Email

 

 

Uncovering, at any given time, how many items are present in someone’s (visual) working memory is a complex task. In my PhD, I will investigate whether computational cognitive models can give insight into working memory usage based on gaze behaviour – and how experimental manipulations affect this usage of working memory. Additionally, I will investigate whether various patient populations use different working memory strategies as compared to healthy controls, by seeing whether machine learning models can dissociate between the two groups based on gaze behaviour and memory usage.

 

Andre Sahakian - PhD Candidate

Utrecht University
Experimental Psychology
Heidelberglaan 1
Room H0.15
Email

 

 

Hi there! I am Andre. My interest goes out to human consciousness. Especially how our brain tricks us into experiencing a rich and vivid visual world, while the input from the eyes is mostly blurry and we are pretty much blind to anything we do not attend. Questions like “How do we represent the visual world around us?” or “What visual information do we store from one moment to the next?” keep me up at night (figuratively). During my PhD I will conduct behavioral experiments in virtual environments to better understand how visual working memory is used in our daily lives. 

 

Sanne Böing - PhD Candidate

Utrecht University
Experimental Psychology
Heidelberglaan 1
Room H0.15
Email

 

 

How do patients with acquired brain injury employ their visual working memory to efficiently perceive and use visual information? Do classical neuropsychological tasks tell the whole story? During my PhD I will try to find out whether eye movement behavior can give insights in underlying (working) memory deficits after acquired brain injury, and whether this relates to findings on tasks used in standard neuropsychological assessment. 

 

 

 

 

Lab alumni

Former PhD students
Yun Ding
Jasper Fabius

Rudmer Menger
Martijn Schut 

Other
Erik Oudman
Joris Elshout